The Highlands Eating Disorder Treatment Center Blog

Author Archives: Highlands Treatment Center

Staff Spotlight: Sydney

 Your role at The Highlands: Unofficial, therapeutic presence dog The thing you love most about working for The Highlands: Belly rubs, bringing smiles to all my friends, napping What brings you joy and happiness in your life: Belly rubs, sunning in the grass, treats, chasing anything that poses a threat    Your favorite quote: From the movie Homeward Bound, Shadow: Has been ever since the dawn of time… when a few wild dogs took it upon themselves to watch over man, to bark when he’s in danger, to run and play with him when he’s happy, to nuzzle him when he’s…

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Eating Disorder Action Day

There are things that all of us can do to raise awareness—and increase empathy—for those struggling with an eating disorder. We can speak up, and make our voices heard; we can share our stories and spread positive, accurate information. We can be ambassadors for hope and recovery, and even help shape public policies and cultural attitudes toward eating disorder recovery. This year, on June 2, there will be many opportunities available for you to join us in this important work. That’s because it’s World Eating Disorder Action Day—as good a time as any to do your part on behalf of…

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Maintain a Healthy Body Image—All Summer Long

Maintaining a healthy body image is tough for all of us. It can be especially daunting for those who deal with an eating disorder. The summer months can amplify these challenges considerably—making summer a perfect time to renew your commitment to positivity and to recovery! Why do the summer months make it so challenging to maintain a healthy body image? Look no further than to all the fashion magazines that adorn supermarket checkout lanes. They place unrealistic body ideals in our view, and challenge us with promises of quick weight loss, beach bodies, bikini readiness and more. Simply put, our…

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National Women’s Health Week

If you have been looking for an excuse to talk about women’s health issues, you are in luck: May 8 through May 14 has been christened National Women’s Health Week 2016. In truth, of course, women’s health issues are important every day, and worthy of our open, candid discussion—but now, we have an invaluable opportunity to bring up women’s health topics that might not be broached otherwise. One of those important topics is that of eating disorders. While eating disorders are equal opportunity offenders, as deadly to men as they are to women, there is no denying that the sheer…

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National Anxiety and Depression Awareness Week

Millions of Americans are impacted by depression and anxiety disorders. Even so, these topics remain mired in stigma. They are uncomfortable to talk about and as such myths and misconceptions persist. The week of May 2 through May 8 presents us all with a unique opportunity to right this wrong, however: It is National Anxiety and Depression Awareness Week, a great time to speak boldly and candidly about mental health and related issues. Perhaps you have never struggled with depression and anxiety; then again, perhaps you are in recovery right now, receiving ongoing treatment for these conditions. Either way, there…

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Why Normalized Eating is Important for Eating Disorder Recovery

Something we often say, with regard to Castlewood’s nutritional philosophy, is that we strive to restore our clients to a place of normalized eating. That is a phrase that warrants some explanation: What is normalized eating, and why does it matter? In our view, normalized eating is characterized by two things—nourishment and pleasure. We want to help those in eating disorder recovery strike a balance between the two. As for the former, we want to help individuals ensure a diet that provides them with all the building blocks of a healthy lifestyle; specific caloric recommendations may vary from one client…

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Castlewood at The Highlands’ Summer Refocus Program

Traditionally, summer has been a season associated with rest and relaxation, with vacation and leisure. For many, though, the summer is a good time to buckle down on important or long-neglected work—including, in some cases, the hard work of eating disorder recovery. That is ultimately, what Castlewood at The Highlands’ Summer Refocus Program is all about: We want to help you focus on your health, your wellness and your recovery. Whether you have been in eating disorder recovery for a while, and need to renew your focus, or you are approaching recovery for the very first time, this is a…

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Overcoming Shame Through Vulnerability

Eating disorders carry with them many intense symptoms—but few can be as debilitating as the experience of shame. Shame, as we define it in eating disorder recovery, is an exceedingly painful and pervasive feeling that you are deeply flawed—and therefore, unworthy of being loved. Breaking through this shame is necessary for true recovery, and for experiencing not only the love of others, but even self-love. The question is, how can shame be overcome? There is no easy answer to this, but there is one ingredient that we want to emphasize—and that is the quality of vulnerability. Vulnerability essentially means putting…

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How to Spring Break with Your Eating Disorder Recovery Intact

Spring break has a reputation for decadence, for giving in to temptation—for really letting yourself go and having fun. For those who are in eating disorder recovery, that can all sound a little bit daunting. The secret is to find ways to have fun without compromising your eating disorder recovery, and without needing the aid of alcohol or drugs—but how? The first step is to assume some personal responsibility. Ultimately, you are the one in charge of your recovery. Nobody else can do it for you. That is a big responsibility, but it can also be liberating. In the end,…

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College and Stress Eating

People eat for different reasons. Ideally, you eat because you’re hungry—but from time to time, we all eat not out of hunger, but out of emotion. Stress, in particular, can cause overeating; and in fast-paced, high-tension environments, such as a college campus, stress eating can be all too common. Why does stress cause us to eat? When stress becomes chronic, it triggers high levels of hormone production—and in particular, a hormone called cortisol. Cortisol, in turn, triggers cravings for foods that are salty, sweet, and/or high in fat. These foods provide a quick burst of energy and pleasure, helping mitigate…

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